Monday, May 25, 2020

The Importance of Books and Ideas to Overpower Censorship - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 6 Words: 1800 Downloads: 3 Date added: 2019/05/29 Category Society Essay Level High school Tags: Censorship Essay Fahrenheit 451 Essay Did you like this example? Ray Bradburyrs, Fahrenheit 451 novel details a dystopian future in which a firemen receive orders to burn books, therefore, the public consists of people who are oblivious and controllable because of government control. The title refers to the temperature at which book paper burns. Throughout the book, Fireman Guy Montag lived the last ten years supporting government oppressing until multiple events including talks of a war lead him to glance at the things he was censoring. Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "The Importance of Books and Ideas to Overpower Censorship" essay for you Create order In the beginning of the novel, Guy and his co-workers, including a robot dog, ferret out books and burn them under orders from the government (Moss). While meeting a young woman one night, clarity is brought to his mind and he begins to question his own ethics which leads him on a significant journey. Through the character of Guy Montag and the symbolism of the firemen system, Bradbury reveals how books and ideas can overcome an oppressive dominion imposing censorship. Throughout the novel Fahrenheit 451, censorship is revealed from the effects of McCarthyism and post World War during the 1950s. Upon meeting a young girl, Guyrs character changes because he believes that he being fed with lies by the government. Shortly after meeting Clarisse McClellan, Guy Montagrs eyes are sprung open behind the fireman system. The work hers been doing for the past ten years is questioned by his own self and the thought if he is truly happy. She looked at him with wonder and curiosity. ?Are you happy (Bradbury 7). As Montag first meets Clarisse, he finds her very odd because he never questioned his way of living or looked beneath the surface of life. Almost as he was chosen to be a fireman instead of the other way around. In society today, Clarisse would not have been known peculiar. But in the novel, Bradbury reveals the government has censored the standardized way of living. In the book, the botched society relates to the era where the Nazis ruled over Germany a nd in which Americans were blaming another for being communist. Like in these countries, the government in the novel make peoplers ideas and thoughts of any philosophy gone or clouded. Just like in the beginning of the book, Clarisse noticed how dull and meaningless everyone around her thought, and she eventually disappeared along with her family because they were not like everyone else. According to Joyce Moss, Clarisse McClellan, an almost-seventeen-year-old girl who wants to live freely and question everything, changes guyrs life. He becomes curious about books and and how their censorship began (Moss). Clarisse changes Guyrs life because she gains his trust as a friend, Montag says she is more mature than his own wife. Even Montagrs wife Mildred lives under the systemrs rules and laws. She spends her days watching television, creating an intimate relationship with the characters on screen. When Montag tells her to turn of the parlor. She tells him, thatrs my family (Bradbury 49). Mildred has been consumed by conformity, just like everyone els e, Montag begins to see how the fireman system is a lie that censors peoplers ability to think and read books. Analyst Bloom mentions how the programing is simplistic and subject to extremely rapid altercations, designed to keep citizens entertained, content, tractable, distracted, and divided (Bloom 16). The fireman system keeps its citizens distracted from the real truth by the means of television. A little while later during a job call, Montag faces his own identity when the sight of the old woman burning to death in defense of her own ideals. He begins to wonder how the book-burning began and why most of the people of the city come to believe in it (Moss). Here, Montag faces his own actions, the question if there really is a meaning in books gathers at the back of his mind. Bradbury embraces the realities of the world being manipulated by a big oppression. As the novel progresses, Montag begins to migrate from what he believed to the truth. As weeks go by, Montagrs presence of uneasiness is scented by the mechanical hound, the hound half rose in its kennel and looked at him with green-blue neon light flickering in its suddenly activated eyebulbs. It growled again, a strange rasping combination of electrical sizzle, a frying sound, a scraping of metal, a turning of cogs that seemed rusty and ancient with suspicion (Bradbury 23). The hound possesses a stinger that attempts to sting Montag. Despite the protestations that the hound is not a danger to him, the hound starts to get suspicious around Montag. Here, His shift of perspective around the firemen system is what makes the hound growl, the author foreshadows the events of which Montag can no longer remain a fireman. As time passes, Montag hears from Mildred that Clarisse has been killed by a speeding car. Montagrs discontent of life grows as he hears this news. He begins to search for clues in books he has stolen from his own fires that he hides in a vent. He recalls the time of the old woman being burnt to death, there must be something in books, something we cant imagine, to make a woman stay in a burning house (Bradbury 34). His search is activated by the burning lady and by the words of Clarisse McClellan. Guy feels uncomfortable with the fireman system that one day he calls off from work, feeling a sense guilt makes him wonder if he is ever going to return being a fireman. His fire chief, Beatty show up at his house knowing that he is going through some sort of phase, Beatty explains that it is normal for a fireman to be curious about what books contain, after all, they are banned from reading. Then the chief goes into a deeper sense, saying that books were first prohibited by a group of minorities who objected books that offended them. And soon, all the books contained the same meaning because the writers in them didnt want to be exposed of the lies that they were being offensive. Beatty explains that firemen stand against the small tide of those who want to make everyone unhappy with conflicting theory and thought (Bradbury 59). Beatty and the firemen shut down those who have an opinion just because they dont like what they have to say. The firemen enforce rules in how they see fit instead of what the people want. The society is ruled by a dictatorship, except the people dont realize it because they are being manipulated. Furthermore, Guy Montag breaks free from his life as a fireman, he realizes that there is a meaning and a man behind books. His search for happiness drives him to call a retired english professor named Farber. Before he finds Farber Montag believes he has the last copy of the Bible, in order to prove his story, Montags rides in the train trying to memorize Ecclesiastes; a book of the Bible. As he is studying, Montag recalls a time when he had sat upon a yellow dune by the sea in the middle of the blue and hot summer day, trying to fill a sieve with sandthe faster he poured, the faster it sifted through with a hot whispering. His hands were tired, the sand was boiling, and the sieve was empty (Bradbury 74). The sieve and the sand symbol a time frame in which Montag tries to memorize passages of Ecclesiastes during the train. The faster he reads, the less he takes out from it. As he meets Farber, he tells Montag that the value of books lies in the detailed writing of life they contain. Faber says that Montag does not only needs books but also the liberty to read them and the freedom to act upon their ideas. To proceed, Farber explains to Montag that the captain belongs to the most dangerous enemy to the truth and freedom, the solid unmoving cattle of the majority, the terrible tyranny of the majority (Bradbury 104). In order to take down the status quo, Farber learns they must not underestimate Beatty, their plan must be devised carefully. Montag finally returns to the fire station and to his surprise, the alarm rings giving the address of his own house. As the firemen arrive to Montagrs house, Beatty demands Montag to burn his own house while his wife Mildred drives away in a taxi, but the whole time Farber has been helping Montag control his emotions by whispering in his ear with earpiece. Farber has been trying to help Montag by whispering in his ear, but now Beatty discovers the ear radio and takes it away. In his confusion, Montagrs hand again move on their own and turn the flamethrower on Beatty, killing him (Fahrenheit). At this turn of event, Mildred has betrayed Montagrs trust and gives Beatty the lead on Montag. Montag then reacts, turning on Beatty and the rest of the firemen as well as the mechanical hound. At this point of the novel, Montag escapes from the government and Farber heads to St. Louis to meet with a retired printer. During Montagrs escape to the river, he meets with a group of intellectuals and man named Granger whose purpose is to lead the group and memorize books until a new order is born. But before Monta g meets them, He goes on to walk through a forest, until he finds the campfire of the book-people where a collective reverie of the forge is in progress. It completely reverses the value previously associated with fire, being humanly warming, and it places time at the service of men whose voice have the power to talk about everything (Touponce). Here, Montagrs view of fire changes significantly because the fire signified destruction, but now, the fire symbolizes anew, and power. Moments later, an atomic bomb destroys the city leading to the rise in Montagrs new crew and their ideas. In the end, Montag and the intellectuals were the last ones standing because of their ideas and books, they did not involved themselves with what the government was demanding them to do. The events that Guy Montag faced throughout the novel, Fahrenheit 451, demonstrate Ray Bradburyrs theme in the importance of books and ideas to defeat a tyrannical system. He wanted readers to understand the importance of reading and thinking. He once said, You dont have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them (Bradbury). Bradbury depicts the meaning behind the novel, such as the censorship the government lays on society. Literary critic Adam Bogar explains, reading for Bradbury is a metaphor of movement in the philosophical sense, that is, of change, of life, of existence, and symbols of, thinking, communication, and interpersonal relationships (Bogar 165). Bradbury demonstrates life lessons which highlights that reading and thought can defy censorship from a dominant control.

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Essay about Environmental Views of Anwr - 2711 Words

Executive Summary The Arctic National Wildlife Reserve (ANWR) is a beautiful 19.6 million acre coastal plain, and is located in the Northeastern part of Alaska. ANWR is home to numerous species of wildlife and one of the largest untapped oil preserves in the United States. There is an immense debate between the opposing environmentalists and the politicians who want to drill for oil on a section of ANWR, which is only 1.8% of the refuge. Environmentalists who oppose drilling for oil in Alaska say the wildlife and the native populations are threatened by drilling for oil in ANWR, even though most of the natives are strongly in favor of drilling. ANWR could save the US from having to import $800 billion worth of foreign oil, creating†¦show more content†¦The U.S. government has come to the conclusion that drilling for oil on only a small part of the refuge will not cause extensive harm to the wildlife and ultimately the environment. The government has compared the consequence s of drilling for oil to the good that it would do for the majority of the people in the US. Not only will it produce one of the largest amounts of oil in North America but also it will provide many jobs to those who live in the surrounding areas. Therefore, is the best decision for the greatest amount of people that the land remains unused and desolate? Again, the majority is in the best interest of ANWR because of the benefit that it would have on the economy, and for the stability of the US. Increasing the oil production in Alaska will not only provide more jobs for residents, but the effect on the economy will help it flourish. The economy will grow beyond comprehension, because the country will have the ability to produce its own oil supply instead of importing oil from other countries. By doing so, the job market will again be stable because of the constant need for workers, and the price of oil will decline. That alone is a great benefit for the majority of the people. Constant worries regarding gas prices and cost of living would then decrease, dramatically. Sacrificing a few acres of land is a small price to pay for the benefit of our Nations existence, prosperity and people. For society to be successful,Show MoreRelated Environmental Views of Arctic National Wildlife Reserve (ANWR)2507 Words   |  11 PagesSummary nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;The Arctic National Wildlife Reserve (ANWR) is a beautiful 19.6 million acre coastal plain, and is located in the Northeastern part of Alaska. ANWR is home to numerous species of wildlife and one of the largest untapped oil preserves in the United States. There is an immense debate between the opposing environmentalists and the politicians who want to drill for oil on a section of ANWR, which is only 1.8% of the refuge. Environmentalists who oppose drilling forRead More Should the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge be opened to Oil Drilling?1544 Words   |  7 PagesDrilling oil in Alaskas Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is a serious issue for environmentalists and for the future of the United States. Should the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge be opened to oil drilling? This paper will debate whether or not we should allow Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to be opened to oil drilling. This will also show the impact it has on the environment, and I will sh ow a critical analysis of the current issue of whether or not to drill. History Arctic NationalRead MoreAlaska Oil Drilling: A Threat to Biodiversity1606 Words   |  6 Pagesbitterly between environmental activists and major petroleum producers, is a parcel of land containing nearly 20 million acres of untouched environmental resources known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). While the ecological importance of the ANWR region is largely undisputed, as the preserve contains critical den grounds for the arctics large mammals, including polar bears, caribou, and walruses, Americas current economic crisis has intensified calls to tap ANWR for the millions ofRead More We Should Allow Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)2541 Words   |  11 Pagesdrilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Proponents say that drilling in ANWR would make the United States more self-sufficient in the area of energy, while at the same time not doing excessive damage to the environment of the area. Opponents of drilling in ANWR cite the environ mental problems of off-shore drilling and maintain that this land should be left alone and allowed to stand as an environmental wonder. Given that some environmental groups do not mind allowing technology to invadeRead MoreEssay about Anwr - We Should Drill3741 Words   |  15 PagesANWR: Drilling Mandatory or Unnecessary Shannon Bowerman Hour 7 Laughlin -- February 12, 2008 English Research Paper Shannon Bowerman Hour 7 February 12, 2008 English Research Paper – Introduction Since 1987, the issue of whether or not drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) should be allowed has been one of the concerns of political figures, as well as many Americans. This issue has been fought before the Senate at leastRead More America Does NOT Need to Drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge5388 Words   |  22 Pagesdeveloping oil in the ANWR, but rather on the topics of conservation through higher fuel efficiency standards in vehicles and by developing alternative energy sources. Conservation, fuel efficiency and alternative energy sources are the solutions that will lead us to a long term and sustainable energy future. I. Introduction The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is located in the northeastern part of Alaska and has been the topic of many recent political and environmental debates. Many ofRead Moreenvironmental hw2074 Words   |  9 Pagescreated and depleted, they cannot be replaced in our civilization. This extremely long process takes thousands of years and if we were to replenish the depleted fossil fuels it would take millions of years. 2) How are fossil fuels formed? How do environmental conditions determine what type of fossil fuel is formed in a given location? Why are fossil fuels often concentrated in localized deposits? Fossil fuels form by preserving the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter.  This organic matter thenRead MoreEssay On Oil Field1709 Words   |  7 PagesThere is water in the reserves, and CO2 further reduces the density. This bridges the gap of between the densities of the oil and gas, thus reducing the gravity segregation effect of the two. One of the biggest advantages of CO2 injection is the environmental benefits. A Norwegian EOR project study concluded it is 150% more environmentally friendly than conventional recovery methods. This doesn’t just include climate benefits, but improvements in acidification and human toxicity. There are an estimatedRead MoreOil Exploration Should Be Banned1239 Words   |  5 Pagesreduce dependence on imported oil and views the ANWR as suitable oil fields to exploit. In order to justify the social and economic costs of oil exploration, it would have to bring significant benefits to the United States, however ‘extracting it would reduce U.S imports by only about 3 percent per year’ (Klare 2004: 60). Environmental Impacts of oil exploration The most visible changes to the pristine arctic as a result of oil exploration are environmental. Many features of the Arctic environmentRead MoreHow Gasoline Prices Work3963 Words   |  16 PagesFederal and state governments each place excise taxes on gasoline. There may also be some additional taxes, such as applicable state sales taxes, gross receipts taxes, oil inspection fees, underground storage tank fees and other miscellaneous environmental fees. Add that to the state excise taxes, and it can average 27.4 cents. It could be worse. In Europe, gas prices are far higher than in America because taxes on gas are much higher. †¢Station markup - Of course some of the money you spend at

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Discrimination And Prejudice By Harper Lee And Of Mice And...

Discrimination and prejudice were very common acts in the early and middle 1900’s. In To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck prejudice is displayed by the acts of hate towards someone’s color of skin. People of color were the majority, that were treated unfairly. During this time in the southern states, black people had to use separate drinking fountains, bathrooms, churches, and even go to separate schools. Even though much of discrimination was driven towards blacks, there were plenty of accounts towards poor families by those that had money. To Kill a Mockingbird, author Harper Lee uses memorable characters to illustrate racism in the segregated Southern United States in the 1930s. The novel is told through the eyes of Scout Finch, you learn about Atticus Finch, her father, an attorney who hopelessly perseveres to prove the innocence of a black man cruelly accused of rape. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck is a novel of many themes and one of them is about discrimination direction against someone of a different race. This theme is quite important because it directly refers to the only black character in the book, Crooks. Steinbeck uses only one of the chapters in the book to explain the unfair treatment of Blacks but it’s enough to see the point. To Kill a Mockingbird The novel To Kill a Mockingbird has many accounts of racism and prejudice. One subtle example of discrimination the reader sees is the treatment of Calpurnia, a blackShow MoreRelatedAmerican History : The Dark Past1556 Words   |  7 PagesAmerican History: The Dark Past Unique characters, stimulating story plot and surprising endings are some reasons people in literature believe the two novels To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck have maintained their long standing positions in American literature. Readers and critics alike spend much time searching for what distinguishes these novels from others. As plain and old these books may seem, their messages are not. To some, the messages of these novelsRead MorePrejudice Is Responsible For The Destruction Of The Innocent2173 Words   |  9 PagesIn ‘To Kill a Mocking Bird’ Atticus says that, ‘it is a sin to kill a mockingbird’. How far would you agree that prejudice is responsible for the destruction of the innocent in ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper lee and ‘of mice and men’ by John Steinbeck? I believe that prejudice is a key theme in both lee and Steinbeck’s novels. It is partly responsible for the destruction of the innocent; but there are other key themes that are equally responsible for this destruction such as: loneliness and religionRead MoreEssay on Racism in Childrens Literature2376 Words   |  10 Pages how do we teach our children the great lesson that these brave authors intended? According to Rogets Super Thesaurus, racism is defined as prejudice, discrimination, bigotry, bias, segregation, apartheid, intolerance, and white supremacy, (463). Throughout the pages of our classic, timeless books, one can find numerous references of hate and prejudice. There has been a move by many to ban these books, but is that really the answer to the problem? As a mother, secure in my belief, I want my childrenRead More Childhood Presented in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison3594 Words   |  15 PagesChildhood Presented in To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Childhood should be a time of great learning, curiosity, joy, playfulness and guiltlessness. The reality is that it can be a time of extreme vulnerability and dependency. The innocence and fragility of a child is easily manipulated and abused if not nurtured and developed. Family relationships are crucial in the flourishing of young minds, but other childhood associations are important too. TheseRead MoreFundamentals of Hrm263904 Words   |  1056 PagesWorkshop 49 Guarding Against Discrimination Practices 65 DID YOU KNOW?: Is a Problem Brewing? 66 Determining Potential Discriminatory Practices 66 The 4/5ths Rule 66 Restricted Policy 66 Geographical Comparisons 67 McDonnell-Douglas Test 67 Responding to an EEO Charge 67 Business Necessity 68 Bona Fide Occupational Qualifications 68 Seniority Systems 68 Selected Relevant Supreme Court Cases 69 Cases Concerning Discrimination 69 Cases Concerning Reverse Discrimination 71 ETHICAL ISSUES IN HRM:Read MoreStephen P. Robbins Timothy A. Judge (2011) Organizational Behaviour 15th Edition New Jersey: Prentice Hall393164 Words   |  1573 PagesModel 23 An Overview 23 †¢ Inputs 24 †¢ Processes 25 †¢ Outcomes 25 Summary and Implications for Managers 30 S A L Self-Assessment Library How Much Do I Know About Organizational Behavior? 4 Myth or Science? â€Å"Most Acts of Workplace Bullying Are Men Attacking Women† 12 An Ethical Choice Can You Learn from Failure? 24 glOBalization! Does National Culture Affect Organizational Practices? 30 Point/Counterpoint Lost in Translation? 31 Questions for Review 32 Experiential Exercise Workforce Diversity

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Bibliog Monk Cantebury Tales Essay Research free essay sample

Bibliog Monk Cantebury Tales Essay, Research Paper Geoffrey Chaucer s, The Canterbury Tales was written in the late 14th century. It is a digest of short narratives, set in the Medieval Period England, told by travellers who are traveling on a pilgrims journey to the Cathedral at Canterbury. Among the going set, a Monk of likely Franciscan ties was a pilgrim of high rank and aristocracy. The Monk in The Canterbury Tales, ranks among the highest compared to the other pilgrims. The Monk belonged to the ecclesiastical estate, which was one relating to a church. The church he belongs to is of Catholic beginning and is hinted at by this line, The Rule of good St.Benet or St.Maur He is likely a member of the order founded by Saint Francis of Assisi in 1209, an order that had concrete connexions with the Roman Catholic Church. The Roman Catholic Church at that clip assumed much influence and power in England. We will write a custom essay sample on Bibliog Monk Cantebury Tales Essay Research or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Even though the Monk is rich, he does allow his money pervert his religion or character. The Monk was fat and a personable priest who did non transport himself as a prig of the higher category. He was fundamentally respectful to the old and sort to the immature. The Monk besides was more unfastened to thoughts and did non follow his religion where he found incorrectly. For illustration, he did non rate that text at a plucked biddy Which says that huntsmans are non holy work forces. He was besides considered brave and righteous by Chaucer s sentiment, And I agreed and said his positions were sound The Monk is a affluent adult male as shown by his visual aspect, and greatly enjoys hunting, reading books and deeply appreciates the finer things in life. Was he to analyze till his caput went unit of ammunition describes his long-run committedness to larning. His many dainty a Equus caballuss, all right Grey pelt and shaped gold cutely fashioned pin leads the reader to believe that he enjoys populating a comfy life. As old and rigorous he tended to disregard ; He let travel by the things of yesterday And took the modern universe s more broad manner describes how he does non let the problems of the twenty-four hours throw him off his felicity. In add-on, his favourite repast, a fat swan best, and roasted whole and his Equus caballus in all right status [ was ] tantrum for exhibition supports that he enjoys populating a high profile life style. Chaucer s sentiment on the Monk is one of positive congratulations and small unfavorable judgment. He describes the monastic as a brave adult male, who is fit plenty to function God due to his relaxation and undefiled patterns. The sentiments of the Monk, says Chaucer, displays that he his good versed on many subjects and demonstrates rightful judgements.

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

John Smith Essays (236 words) - Americas, Racism, Food And Drink

John Smith History When it comes to describing why relative concentration of energy shifts from Asia and Africa to the North Atlantic region, resulting in the emergence of more complex societies in the North Atlantic world, I am going to focus on the two factors I feel are most important forming this occurrence. In this paper, I am going to discuss the importance of these factors and what they did history over time. The two most important factors that helped this energy shift from Asia/Africa to the North Atlantic region resulting in the emergence of more complex societies in the North Atlantic World are in my opinion sugar and the Atlantic slave trade. Throughout history sugar and the Atlatntic slave trade have been two things that have been brought to attention many times. Sugar has become something in all countries today that has been used to produce a lot of wholesome products and beverages. Other things sugar has to offer include fuel and livestock feed. The other important factor is the Atlant ic slave trade. Although the Atlantic slave trade is not something people look at as something good that has happened, it not only diversified the world and also helped with major farming and industrial production. I will start to examine and explain why I chose these two factors as the most important to the shifts of energy towards the emergences of more complex societies.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Thin Line Between Love And Lust Sonnet 128

written are flattering. Yet the poet turns the flattering to lust when the compliments are more gratifying for his sexual desire than any love that may be present. The sonnet is full of compliments of this sort. Ten of the fourteen lines that make up the sonnet are devoted to compliments. Except the compliments, instead of being gratifying are obsessive and sexual. â€Å"I envy those jacks that nimble leap to kiss the tender inward of thy hand† (128.5-6). He is addressing his wish to be the keys on the virginal she is playing exhibiting his over obsessiveness. The sexual desire found here is also evident in line 12 â€Å"Making dead wood more blessed than living lips†. By finding the keys that touch her hand more blessed than his lips that stand alone the line simultaneously shows his vulgar want of the woman’s body. Clark 2 â€Å"Since saucy jacks so happy are in this† (13). He is in a sense putting down her in a vulgar manner by telling the woman playing the instrument that her keys are irrelevant to the situation. As if she needs to quit the playing that she is enjoying doing and pay attention to him. Along with the obscene vulgar ness he displays an unfulfilled longing for the woman he feels the need to control and jealously of the keys that get the chance to touch her body. â€Å"Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap... Free Essays on Thin Line Between Love And Lust Sonnet 128 Free Essays on Thin Line Between Love And Lust Sonnet 128 There is a Thin Line Between Love and Lust In Shakespeare’s sonnets the idea of love is a frequent topic. The love he normally speaks of is disclosing a sense of purity. However in sonnet 128 Shakespeare proclaims a pure love that can be viewed as promiscuous and lustful. At first sight sonnet 128 seems to contain an unalloyed love and desire for someone else. Nothing in the sonnet seems to have a negative tone intently. Actually the words written are flattering. Yet the poet turns the flattering to lust when the compliments are more gratifying for his sexual desire than any love that may be present. The sonnet is full of compliments of this sort. Ten of the fourteen lines that make up the sonnet are devoted to compliments. Except the compliments, instead of being gratifying are obsessive and sexual. â€Å"I envy those jacks that nimble leap to kiss the tender inward of thy hand† (128.5-6). He is addressing his wish to be the keys on the virginal she is playing exhibiting his over obsessiveness. The sexual desire found here is also evident in line 12 â€Å"Making dead wood more blessed than living lips†. By finding the keys that touch her hand more blessed than his lips that stand alone the line simultaneously shows his vulgar want of the woman’s body. Clark 2 â€Å"Since saucy jacks so happy are in this† (13). He is in a sense putting down her in a vulgar manner by telling the woman playing the instrument that her keys are irrelevant to the situation. As if she needs to quit the playing that she is enjoying doing and pay attention to him. Along with the obscene vulgar ness he displays an unfulfilled longing for the woman he feels the need to control and jealously of the keys that get the chance to touch her body. â€Å"Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Key facts Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Key facts - Assignment Example The second step is to determine the key elements of the cause of action that is raised by the facts of case. The third step is to outline all the facts of the case that are important to the elements of action raised in the second step. The fourth and final step is to outline which of the facts listed satisfy the key elements of the cause of action to be discussed in a court of law. There are three steps used in indentifying the facts in a court opinion. The first step involves reading the entire case having in mind what was decided in regards to what facts of the case were. The second step is to read and analyze the holding of the case. This helps to understand how the court answered the legal questions raised on the facts of the case. The last step is analyzing the key facts used to make the holding of the case (Albright & Putman, 2013). Police in Burbank initiated surveillance on Leon after receiving confidential information that they were selling cocaine and investigation earlier showed that he stored a stash of methaqualone in his house. After a search Leon was indicted by a grand jury in California and charged with drug trafficking. The court granted a motion to suppress evidence arguing it was defective due to the warrant and lack of probable cause. On Appeal, the government argued that the police acted on good faith when using the defective warrant. The court of appeal affirmed trial court decision and declined the government argument of good faith. Reasoning: The exclusionary rule was a judicial act not a constitutional right that safeguards the Fourth Amendment. It deters police from misconduct and abuse. However, a police who acts with a defective warrant in good faith cannot be held for misconduct. There lacks basis when evidence is suppressed when they relied in good faith using a defective search